. /../Technologically Inept/ 1234567
krush kill 'n destroy
written by Geekofdeath on Jun 19, 2007 22:46
All of us have friends, cousins, uncles, mothers, fathers or all of the above who just don't understand a thing about computers and just do amazingly dumb activities on them (and probably even around them). We all know we do. Sure, grandfathers and indeed parents over 70 probably have an excuse to not know computers... but 15 year olds? 20 year olds? You know, those with no computers, those with no Internet, those with computers but not good with them, those that have Macs but are forced by the school to use PCs, those that use PCs that are forced by the school to use Macs and those that use Linux (although if you know Linux is an alternative, you probably know a lot more about computers than many Windows users) that absolutely fail every time to remember that ALT+F4 means exit.

List all the amusingly stupid things that you've seen people do on a computer and, if you're up to it, your own crazy blunders. I have here some general things:

1. Listing Google as a source on an essay project.
2. Deleting things like heck but not emptying recycling bin; then wondering why their hard drive is full.
3. Typing in web URLs in search bars.
4. Typing out the whole "http://www." before getting to the website.
5. Turning on the screen, but not the computer and freaking out because the monitor says "No Signal."
6. Telling the printer to print, then waiting, then telling it to print the same page because the printer was not printing, then telling it again again, ad infinitum. This results in, of course, a plethora of wasted paper. When the next person that comes up notices "Please Insert More Paper," they do so to get their own projects, but then have to wait for the previous user's finale of the paper-wasting parade.
7. Using really unreadable fonts and expecting you to read it aloud.
8. Falling for the famous ALT+F4 or CTRL+W pranks.
9. Having a MySpace account, but making the background [Insert Wildly Bright Color Here] with [Insert Equally Wildly Bright Color Here] text while making the cursor a butterfly and showing hundreds of ugly GIF animations collected off some image search engine.
10. Setting the backgrounds of their computer (even school computers) to a checkered hell of the same picture, probably of something annoyingly trivial.
11. Increasing the size of an image on a powerpoint, making it blurry and making the circles look like ovals whilst assuming it to be presentable.
12. Linking "www.google.html" as a source because "www.google.com" would not automatically make a link in MS Powerpoint.
13. Accidentally pressing the "Insert" button whilst they were using MS Word, and going back to edit something only to discover that it's rewriting over top the words they put down.
14. Having a brazillion shortcuts, ZIP folders, "New Folders", memos and web links on their desktop.
15. Typing out full questions, including punctuation and capitilization (despite using neither while talking to others over IM apps) into search engines.
16. Always and forever using the button "Save As..." to save documents, creating an immense hellhole of the same file, only in different stages of development, making it confusing (as all would probably have similar names) as to which they should open the next time they log in.
17. Using "Cut" instead of "Delete" to delete objects.
18. Wondering why the computer is making no sound and doing everything to fix it (unhooking speakers, hooking them in different ports, etc.), even though all they needed to do was to go to the bottom right of the screen to the "Volume" icon.
19. Accidently pressing the mute button on their keyboard and wondering why there is no sound (I admit I did this several times).
20. Putting upright computers sideways (usually as a matter of habit) because that's what they used to do when they were young. This meant that the CD drive was rendered perfectly useless.
21. Wholeheartedly believing in Selle Czech and hence not reading their report, resulting in a report with really weird words and sentences.
22. Invariably using the "For this [Insert Project Here], I did [Insert Noun Here]" at the beginning of every thesis statement (which is supposed to catch the reader's attention).

More when I come to it.
hello! :) felysian
written by Hello! :) on Jun 19, 2007 23:28
Geekofdeath said:
3. Typing in web URLs in search bars.
When I want to visit a suspicious page/link. I tend to feed the URL to Google so I can examine Google's cache of the page.

Geekofdeath said:
4. Typing out the whole "http://www." before getting to the website.
I have found that some sites do not know how to handle this properly. On top of that I keep my security settings very strict and because of that the settings will require the "www". I have also learned that having http:// in some browsers when attempting to navigate to some domain names (one specific example is IE to localhost).

Besides that, having the http://www.whatever.com makes it look pretty, I really hate the jammed up look that http://somesite.com has. (I don't find http://0x44.com jammed up, in fact it's one of the few domain names that look better without the www. in front.)

Geekofdeath said:
14. Having a brazillion shortcuts, ZIP folders, "New Folders", memos and web links on their desktop.
To each his (or her) own.
Some people like having plenty of shortcuts on their desktop, others like it bare. I usually bounce between 50% to 100% depending on how much space I have on my installation partition. They may also be coming from a *nix background where all their personal stuff has to be in their home folder (or desktop).

Geekofdeath said:
16. Always and forever using the button "Save As..." to save documents, creating an immense hellhole of the same file, only in different stages of development, making it confusing (as all would probably have similar names) as to which they should open the next time they log in.
I'm not sure what you mean here, but I'm assuming you mean having different file revisions/versions? Well to tell you the truth, I would love to have that habit. I occasionally write a large chunk of code, then think about it and realize that it was a waste; select, delete; save. Only to remember exactly why I was coding it in the first place. Then I have to enter it all back in.
Many Revisions > A Single File, from personal experience.

Geekofdeath said:
17. Using "Cut" instead of "Delete" to delete objects.
Ever hear of convenience? I do that on occasion, usually because my left hand is nearly in position. Meanwhile I'd have to move my right hand and even possibly look to see where I should move my right hand.

Side note: Pretty much the only reason why you can't get me to fall for any keyboard pranks is because I learned how to navigate completely by keyboard (due to the fact that the mouse I was using was crappy and barely enough space to move it around; therefore it was a whole lot faster to use the keyboard than the mouse; I eventually had to stop using the keyboard because if you look at any random site, there are too many links to make navigating by keyboard efficient).
krush kill 'n destroy
written by Geekofdeath on Jun 19, 2007 23:55
Hello! said:
When I want to visit a suspicious page/link. I tend to feed the URL to Google so I can examine Google's cache of the page.
Remember, the people I'm talking about don't know what Google cache is. Certainly, I would use the cache if I had a suspicious URL, but you do know what kind of people we're talking about?

Hello! said:
I have found that some sites do not know how to handle this properly. On top of that I keep my security settings very strict and because of that the settings will require the "www". I have also learned that having http:// in some browsers when attempting to navigate to some domain names (one specific example is IE to localhost).

Besides that, having the http://www.whatever.com makes it look pretty, I really hate the jammed up look that http://somesite.com has. (I don't find http://0x44.com jammed up, in fact it's one of the few domain names that look better without the www. in front.)
Ok, that's not stupid, but it wastes time because the browsers and websites that such people use don't really need the "www".

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Www.#WWW_prefix_in_Web_addresses

Hello! said:
To each his (or her) own.
Some people like having plenty of shortcuts on their desktop, others like it bare. I usually bounce between 50% to 100% depending on how much space I have on my installation partition. They may also be coming from a *nix background where all their personal stuff has to be in their home folder (or desktop).
I mean extra ZIP folder left over from downloads that they don't need, folders left over from transferring files and shortcuts that they never use. A desktop filled with unused icons is ugly. Only if they are used constantly then they can be look over.

Hello! said:
I'm not sure what you mean here, but I'm assuming you mean having different file revisions/versions? Well to tell you the truth, I would love to have that habit. I occasionally write a large chunk of code, then think about it and realize that it was a waste; select, delete; save. Only to remember exactly why I was coding it in the first place. Then I have to enter it all back in.
Many Revisions > A Single File, from personal experience.
Again, I know that Save As... is good for keeping history (I forgot to add that bit in to #16), but many people I know were told to use "Save As...", and so they regardlessly use "Save As..." whenever they save. This is fine in itself, but when you're making bitmaps of solar eclipses or a report on the history of cheese, it hardly makes a difference.

Hello! said:
Ever hear of convenience? I do that on occasion, usually because my left hand is nearly in position. Meanwhile I'd have to move my right hand and even possibly look to see where I should move my right hand.
Although that might be a good thing, the people I'm talking about probably aren't concerned with the position of the left or right hands; typing for them is already enough.

Hello! said:
Side note: Pretty much the only reason why you can't get me to fall for any keyboard pranks is because I learned how to navigate completely by keyboard (due to the fact that the mouse I was using was crappy and barely enough space to move it around; therefore it was a whole lot faster to use the keyboard than the mouse; I eventually had to stop using the keyboard because if you look at any random site, there are too many links to make navigating by keyboard efficient).
Although I'm a mouse user, I like to use the keyboard sometimes as well; it's fun just showing off and turning off all computers in the lab with a ENTER+ALT+S+ENTER combination (though it freezes the computers sometimes, probably because of its ancient Pentium 2 processor) while everyone else uses the mouse, which is really close in that case. I also like to use ALT+F4 to get out of programs and CTRL+C and V to copy/paste, to say nothing of the "Del" and "Delete" buttons to delete.

PS- I seem to be insulting the inept; but I just can't help to notice some of their awkward mistakes.
hello! :) felysian
written by Hello! :) on Jun 20, 2007 00:21
Yeah, I was fairly sure for everything other than #4, it wasn't fully/properly clarified. But it was really #4 that caused me to start nit-picking the others.

Now yes most sites now properly work without having www prepended to it, some browser settings and security settings don't. For example, I'm primarily using Opera right now because you can tweak the settings on a per site basis, unfortunately it doesn't accept wildcards for the sites so http://www.somesite.com and http://somesite.com are two very different sites*. But the reason I go into it is some sites that do not properly handle the differences between the www. and the plain is usually found in forum software when they "redirect" you to another page (i.e. like after you post something to review your message). If it isn't properly set up it may redirect you across the web addresses causing the per-site security settings to get screwed up (I have personally experienced this, using FireFox even, so don't tell me it doesn't happen).

That's why I like postline, it only cares about the relative path, except when posting links to one of the scripts: http://www.anywherebb.com/postline/index.php and http://0x44.com/postline/index.php if you are coming from the other domain (i.e. click on the anywherebb.com link while browsing from 0x44.com and vice-versa) will cause it to open up in a new window.

* They really are two very different web addresses. Usually (or maybe even all the time, honestly I've never seen them different myself) they both point to the same IP address, but not considering this possibility would be a major oversight.

Edit: Oh it also can break browser's histories if they ever switch between www. and not.
faces or a vase?
written by Tom on Jun 20, 2007 00:42
Hello! said:
Geekofdeath said:
16. Always and forever using the button "Save As..." to save documents, creating an immense hellhole of the same file, only in different stages of development, making it confusing (as all would probably have similar names) as to which they should open the next time they log in.
I'm not sure what you mean here, but I'm assuming you mean having different file revisions/versions? Well to tell you the truth, I would love to have that habit. I occasionally write a large chunk of code, then think about it and realize that it was a waste; select, delete; save. Only to remember exactly why I was coding it in the first place. Then I have to enter it all back in.
I thought I was the only person who did this...

Probably the dumbest thing I've ever seen anyone do: once, I was removing spyware and viruses from a friend's computer. He had the worst infection of trojans and spyware I had ever seen. Well, as soon as I had explained to him what spyware was, and used Zango as an example, he said to me, "well, I have to have Zango, all the kids' games are Zango." and promptly reinstalled it.

Now, Zango is a nasty piece of spyware, just check vitalsecurity.org for stories about it, but he refused to listen...
krush kill 'n destroy
written by Geekofdeath on Jun 20, 2007 01:17
Vital Srcurity said:
Even better, each one proclaims "Add this content to your page!" No doubt eager Myspace users, desperate to have some "killer countent" on their sites will eagerly cut and paste this code onto their profiles, unaware that to play these things, you have to install Zango Adware on the viewer's PC.
God, this Zango thing is going above and beyond adware.

I know a friend who had so many viruses (one that he couldn't delete which continuously made even more viruses) that I told him just to reformat his hard drive.
a title is a curious thing...
written by Granpire viking man on Jun 20, 2007 01:32
Geekofdeath said:
2. Deleting things like heck but not emptying recycling bin; then wondering why their hard drive is full.
Uh, Windows Reserves hard drive space for the recycle bin in advance so you will see less hard drive space than you really have. And I know Linux is an alternative(I am getting it in fact), so I must know a lot about computers. Although I know I do anyway, no matter what anyone says.

Also I say:

23. Ending explorer.exe because they saw it at the top of the processes list in CPU usage order. I know it is necessary when the computer is frozen, but not for this purpose.
krush kill 'n destroy
written by Geekofdeath on Jun 20, 2007 02:03
@23... ha.

I wonder why teachers don't teach students during Word Processing to use CTRL+ALT+DELETE and right click the crashing program, then go to process to delete the process. Perhaps they teach that in high school. If they do, they should teach it earlier. It's a heckuva lot faster way than clicking the X button.

What happens if this reserved Recycling Bin space is full? Does it ask you to empty it? I don't know because I always empty it after deleting something, though, I once had 6000 some-odd files, but those were all deleted at once and promptly permanently deleted, in fact....

http://anywherebb.com/postline/cd/gifs/WZVelL9fhk5eO0t3qbx5C31.gif

Apparently it was 8000 files.

About Linux, I doubt many Junior High, and indeed High Schoolers know about it. There are many exceptions, but not compared to the whole.
written by Bellum on Jun 20, 2007 02:37
Hehe, I do 18 and 19 all the time. My elbow will hit the mute button and I'll have no idea why my sounds not working. I've only just recently found out what I was doing.


What's worse, all the ports on my sound card are the same color, so every time I have to re hook my computer, I have to plug in the speaker several times.
a title is a curious thing...
written by Granpire viking man on Jun 20, 2007 02:47
I don't think that would be safe though(23). That made laugh(the 8000 files).
krush kill 'n destroy
written by Geekofdeath on Jun 20, 2007 03:03
Oh, it would be safe, so long as you don't go about ending the System or EXPLORER processes.

Bellum, you reminded me of something:

24. Plugging in the monitor to the motherboard instead of the video card and wondering why the monitor isn't working; I did that myself once. Almost thought I broke the monitor (I was playing around with the buttons).
hello! :) felysian
written by Hello! :) on Jun 20, 2007 03:44
23 is truely safe. Infact, when I run out of memory, I routinely kill explorer.exe (as it's restartable) as the first "system" process I kill.

If I need more memory, I also some of the svchost.exe's but I usually don't because they aren't too demanding. For fun I also will kill csrss.exe, smss.exe, and a few of the other "critical" ones and then run: shutdown -a to prevent my system from automatically restarting.

I do rarely kill anything other than explorer.exe due to the fact that to start the other processes, it really takes a reboot. Oh yeah, cmd.exe+windows taskmanager = total system control, forget explorer.exe, it's unnecessary!

Geekofdeath said:
Oh, it would be safe, so long as you don't go about ending the System or EXPLORER processes.
You can't kill System/System idle process from the taskmanager, but at the kernel level, you undoubtedly could "hide" it from the task switcher essentially terminating it.

Oh, shift+delete = skip recycle bin. Sure I can set it up so it will automatically do that, but I've gotten used to shift+deleting, so changing it would probably seriously confuse me.
written by Ysereh on Jun 20, 2007 04:04
Geekofdeath said:
...
5. Turning on the screen, but not the computer and freaking out because the monitor says "No Signal."
...
My father used to work in technical support, and some woman called once who did just this. After he explained to her that "the big tower with all the buttons and lights is the computer and must be turned on," she was so thankful and amazed that she brought him a homemade pie.
written by Stellanaut on Jun 20, 2007 06:39
25: Wondering why my channels on my audio were backwards... just to realize I was wearing my headset backwards.
whatever.
written by Bgreman on Jun 20, 2007 18:36
Hello! said:
Oh, shift+delete = skip recycle bin. Sure I can set it up so it will automatically do that, but I've gotten used to shift+deleting, so changing it would probably seriously confuse me.
This.

When people see me do it they go, "What was that?" I tell them I just deleted the file without dealing with the recycle bin, and they always worry, "What if you accidentally deleted something?"

In the four years I've known about shift+delete, I've only ever accidentally deleted something TWICE, and both occurred when I was drunk.
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