. /../Interview with Alex?/ 12
i haz title: speed-g-dof
written by Speeder on May 14, 2012 12:41
It was really multiplayer?

I do not think I ever saw another player in-game...
lost, not forgotten
written by Alex on May 14, 2012 13:27
Speeder said:
I miss Avatar
Me too. It was randomly distracting, something to pass time with.
But I never found enough continuous will to bring the new version of it to completion.
I'm almost sure one day it will be back, though. I think it's one of those things that shouldn't be somewhat recreated in Keyway: it wouldn't be the same to play it 3D, it'd look too much like any other online RPGs with their dedicated clients. The glyph-based rendering and lack of detail gave it a peculiar atmosphere. Today, it'd be even possible to play it straight in a browser, given the @font-face CSS directive.

Speeder said:
And I almost got a girl because of it (several girls looked at me playing and thought it was so cool and nerdy and hipster or something like that...
Heh, I bet it did look nerdy, especially without its fonts.

Speeder said:
It was really multiplayer?
"Massively". It was flat-file based, most files written in random access mode (not sequential), and thus pretty fast, it could probably hold hundreds players together. The new version I was preparing used SQL tables, though.
a title is a curious thing...
written by Granpire viking man on May 14, 2012 13:28
That's what Alex designed it to be (an MMORPG), and I think I did arrange to play with RaptorJedi and a couple of others one day, but it didn't last very long, and I think only RJ came on at all, besides me.

Except for that one day, though, I never got to play with anyone.

Was there ever a "heyday" for Avatar?
lost, not forgotten
written by Alex on May 14, 2012 13:37
Granpire viking man said:
Except for that one day, though, I never got to play with anyone.
Well, I see how it could become boring after a short while. It used to, even to me. There were some fun moments I still remember, which seem to be typical when you play for the fun of seeing what happens, rather than for reaching a goal, and you have the code in your hands and listen to real-time suggestions from others around. In Avatar, things were rather simple to implement as extras: you didn't need 3D models, fancy textures, an elaborate interface, nah... just glyphs, silhouettes sketched in a font maker, some additions to arrays, and some lines of extra php code. I think I might have laughed for 20 minutes straight after a guy playing as a squirrel unexpectedly shot down my phoenix with a 6-shot revolver. The laughing part was attempting to imagine a squirrel holding a revolver. Those are the things I miss the most of Avatar.
a title is a curious thing...
written by Granpire viking man on May 15, 2012 01:22
What I loved about Avatar was the silly dialogue you got to hear from the NPCs.

At least, for a while. After some time, you start to hear lines repeated. I remember walking about just to ask NPCs the strangest questions in order to carry on a conversation. It never worked, of course, but I had fun trying.
lost, not forgotten
written by Alex on May 15, 2012 01:31
They had a very very simple script for chatting. It was however focused on game features, so it could restrict the NPC's "knowledge" to a limited set of topics, which possibly made them look smarter than they were. Other than riddles and corresponding prizes, the most interesting feature was that you could ask NPCs to do something among their abilities: the doctor in the main level was given a healing action and you could therefore ask him to heal your character. That was rather flexible for masterspirits to make use of.
i haz title: speed-g-dof
written by Speeder on May 15, 2012 01:39
Heh

I remember how I got pissed many times for being killed in a stupid way...

But I think that is the whole point of games like this
a title is a curious thing...
written by Granpire viking man on May 15, 2012 01:40
That makes me wish I could go back and try things now...

When that squirrel killed your phoenix, was that another actual player? How many people ever played at one time?
written by Chad on May 15, 2012 03:04
Yeah, it was fun at times. As a MS I enjoyed trying to build new worlds. The browser-based idea was great for it at the time.

Makes me want to play it again. Should put up an older version. -_^

I doubt there was ever more then 5 at a time when it first came online. But 90% of the time you where alone. I'm sure if this place was more popular, and got more attention of course more would be around.
a lot of logins
written by Mingamango181 on May 15, 2012 10:31
I miss the days that were never had.

Curious about it, but not too curious.
lost, not forgotten
written by Alex on May 15, 2012 13:03
Granpire viking man said:
That makes me wish I could go back and try things now...
It will probably be back someday and it's not going to be very different, just improved in terms of graphics and in-game features.

Granpire viking man said:
When that squirrel killed your phoenix, was that another actual player?
Yes, one who used to only roam through Avatar worlds, possibly never seen on the forums.
i haz title: speed-g-dof
written by Speeder on May 15, 2012 13:39
Alex said:
Granpire viking man said:
That makes me wish I could go back and try things now...
It will probably be back someday and it's not going to be very different, just improved in terms of graphics and in-game features.
That does not apply to like 99% of sequels?
written by Mvgulik on May 15, 2012 16:13
I see I'm not the only one taking a peek at AnyNoWhere again.
lost, not forgotten
written by Alex on May 17, 2012 09:42
Speeder said:
Alex said:
Granpire viking man said:
That makes me wish I could go back and try things now...
It will probably be back someday and it's not going to be very different, just improved in terms of graphics and in-game features.
That does not apply to like 99% of sequels?
Not to mines.
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