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lost, not forgotten
written by Alex on Mar 02, 2004 01:15
...aka the "Avatar World Client", as I was calling it in my projects' folder. This is absolutely non-working. It's a bare "3D infrastructure" giving an idea of how I was intending that to be. I didn't work at it for months, though, and I won't restart now, until I'm done with NV. So this is just a "preview" out of curiosity.

cd/zips/Alex/avatar_world_client (190 Kb)

it allows to move and look around.
the menus are almost all not working, but the THM editor shows some early functionality: the THM editor is being worked as a separate project at the moment, it's meant to edit details for NV.
rawr
written by Raptorjedi on Mar 02, 2004 01:37
Very nice, even though you can't really do anything, just looking at it is fun, see!

written by Cryoburner on Mar 02, 2004 07:50
Nice... I see you have the ability to disable the 'quadscan' anti-aliasing, which cuts the generated area to 1/4 its full size. I assume that Noctis will likely have a similar option, where the full 1024x768 version is never even generated, for those using slower computers.

For the browser, I like how you use the smooth transitions to mask jumping from one grid location to the next. The ability to "climb" is cool too, although I did notice my view poking through the bricks a couple times while the movement was taking place. Now... if only we could get that lens flare to be 'real'. : )

One question... will you be making a modified version of the php script for this? After all, having all that HTML transmitted each move would be a definite waste. I suppose you'll add something like the enhancements for other browsers, since you can potentially send much more compact code to your own specialized front-end.

Anyway, it looks good so far, and I'll be interested to see where this goes once you continue work on it. I'm betting you'll be able to incorporate many interesting features from the Noctis game engine.
journeyman
written by Stargazer on Mar 02, 2004 08:13
Not bad at all - a nice tech-test to say the least. The THM GE seems to be coming about nicely, an interesting take on modelling. As Cryo said, I also found some clipping problems when trying to climb the structure, but nothing serious. Also, you may want to concider having some kind of lock for the vision - as it is now, the caracter can turn in all directions without any limitations of biology. Maybe locking the view at about 80 degrees?
But nice work overall, Alex!
└> last changed by Stargazer on March 02, 2004 at 08:48
rawr
written by Raptorjedi on Mar 02, 2004 08:16
Gazer, the version he used for that is a early one, the current version is most likely much better. ^_^
written by Overtilt on Mar 02, 2004 08:17
so... this means we'll eventually be able to play Avatar with 3D graphics? That's pretty neat! "anti-aliasing" and all! I'm not sure I see the difference in quality in the other thingy, though...
journeyman
written by Stargazer on Mar 02, 2004 08:38
Frespych Logs said:
01:29, Lightning4> Alex, if NV is going to look like that, I'll posetively hug you to death.
01:29, Alex> really? it looks better
Now that sounds like really good news.
written by Overtilt on Mar 02, 2004 10:22
I was hoping it'd look better. I mean, that thing is pretty cool, but I DO expect more from NV.
lost, not forgotten
written by Alex on Mar 02, 2004 11:48
Well, the engine is the same: it's Pitagora. The antialiasing method (quadscan) is the same. NV has a special version of Pitagora allowing for more control over pixel effects, and of course more stuff to render so it overall looks a bit better than that, but hey, OT, I just hope you don't expect too much... the "technology" is about that.

*shrugs*

ATM, however, it was just placed here out of curiosity: I won't be working on it, even to change a single byte in the source, because I foresee that if I started fiddling with that client again, I'd put a lot of time into it, delaying our known goal so yeah, see it, but nevermind any possible changes, it was just a prototype and that client is probably only around 25% complete.
written by Overtilt on Mar 02, 2004 11:54
Don't get me wrong. It DOES look good, to a certain extent, but from what I've heard and seen, NV will be much prettier. We've seen the pictures, and we've seen the NV drifter model in action. We know the resolution will be higher than what we see here. That's all I meant.

Oh, and the anti-aliasing... It looks very purdy, but it's not actual anti-aliasing, right? I'm just curious as to if I've understood the concept of 3D aa. This is basically the same as Noctis IV aa, right?
lost, not forgotten
written by Alex on Mar 02, 2004 12:37
Nope, it's different.

Antialiasing in general means avoiding pixels' aliasing, aka the "how many beautiful little lamps" effect. Antialiasing, afaik, is only applied to 2D, and when a 3D render comes to project the scene on 2D, it's then applied to the single pixels.

Antialiasing used in NIV works by making a 2x2 pixel average on a 320x200 frame buffer. If it was to work like that of NV, it'd be working by making the same kind of average filter over a 640x400 frame buffer, and then plot only 1 pixel every 4. So quadscan it's quite different.
written by Niels on Mar 02, 2004 16:35
This 3D avatar thing does look pretty good, especially since it's made with your very own programming langue (wich I'll prob. never understand how people manage to make that). But my question is now: does the fps of this program equal to the fps of NV (in simple enviorments like deserts and oceans)?
journeyman
written by Stargazer on Mar 02, 2004 17:13
Niels said:
But my question is now: does the fps of this program equal to the fps of NV (in simple enviorments like deserts and oceans)?
That again depends on how much is on the scene, and what feature you have activated (such as the quadscan - the anti-aliaser, which may take more system resources to render). But I suspect it might be somewhat the same, although NV will look somewhat different from this tech-demo.
unreal engine 3.0
written by Crembo on Mar 02, 2004 17:14
Alex said:
Nope, it's different.

Antialiasing in general means avoiding pixels' aliasing, aka the "how many beautiful little lamps" effect. Antialiasing, afaik, is only applied to 2D, and when a 3D render comes to project the scene on 2D, it's then applied to the single pixels.

Antialiasing used in NIV works by making a 2x2 pixel average on a 320x200 frame buffer. If it was to work like that of NV, it'd be working by making the same kind of average filter over a 640x400 frame buffer, and then plot only 1 pixel every 4. So quadscan it's quite different.
*Ahem* did someone call for the explainer dude?
*looks around*
Yep, betcha they did.

Antialiasing: The process of removing so-called 'aliasing' from an image. Aliasing is what you get when you try to draw curves with square blocks like pixels - it just won't do, as it produces jagged edges or 'jaggies'. This is where antialiasing comes in, appearing to 'smooth' the edges.

There are many ways to do anti-aliasing. One way is to scan an image, looking for pixels that are too different from one another. Once past this 'threshold', they're blended together.

Another, quite popular method in raytracing, is called super-sampling or sub-sampling, not quite sure which.. But this -exactly- what Alex did. In this method, you take several 'samples' per pixel - 2, 4, 8, 16, 32... And blend them together. What Alex calls 'quadscan' is, in fact, a super-sample antialias of an order of magnitude of 4!

And there you have it.
written by Overtilt on Mar 02, 2004 17:21
Just like Alex said, then?

I know what anti-aliasing IS, I've worked enough with pixel art and photoshop for that, I was just asking what kind of anti-aliasing Alessandro were doing for NV. I hear there is a method of anti-aliasing 3D games that anti-aliases only the edges of 3D objects, instead of aa-ing the whole frame. Maybe I heard wrong, but I seem to remember something like that.
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